Titirangi Storyteller

Telling tales from around the world

Posts Tagged ‘postaday2011

Happy New Year!

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I have a feeling this will be a challenging year, maybe more than most. But we’ll get through – we always do. Somehow. Somehow this planet of ours keeps spinning on its axis, each perfect turn the makings of one more perfect day. What we do with that is up to us. Fortunately, we get 366 of them this year.

Joy to the World!

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31/12/2011 at 11:15 pm

Party of three

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Spotted this young woman at a party a couple of years ago – always wanted to use this shot for something… I rather like how this has turned out…

A late comment to add… whilst I have no tattoos myself, I realise now that at least part of the reason I like this photo so much is that the young lady looks very much like I did at that age. Did not realise that until yesterday. Odd, that.

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29/12/2011 at 11:07 pm

watermelon sunset

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Nope – this one is not photoshopped at all. Straight out of the camera…

Something I’ve learned about sunsets – the good stuff is just beginning once the sun disappears below the horizon… that’s when the reflected light on the clouds and dust particles in the air really work their magic.

I bet it tastes just like watermelon.

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29/12/2011 at 12:23 am

Dandelions

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28/12/2011 at 12:41 am

Dinner is served

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I love that moment when everything is ready and on the table, hot and fragrant and you don’t know where to begin… and can’t wait to start…

It was a heavenly meal, ham & salmon with tons of fresh veg and my husband Bobby’s prize-winning onion rolls, ending with a dessert selection one might literally die for – classic cheesecake, peanut butter pie (daughter’s decadent contribution) and lemon meringue pie. Magic.

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27/12/2011 at 1:08 am

Serengeti Christmas Dream

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Merry Christmas!

Not quite sure why this feels like Christmas to me, but it does – a repost from June… I’ve added a song from a Zimbabwean singer, Oliver Mtukudzi called Neria, which a Swedish friend claimed as his favourite Christmas song of the year, even though it doesn’t directly have anything to do with Christmas. It fits the image perfectly I think. And maybe together they capture at least part of what Christmas means to me.

Step inside your zebra-mind and glide.

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24/12/2011 at 11:01 pm

Uh oh, Santa!

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Actually… what I did… I mean, it was ten o’clock in the morning, hardly anyone at the mall yet. Squeezing in a bit of last minute this and that…

I tried to photograph Santa having a quiet moment before the onslaught of the children. And he saw me. And got rather angry. Right after this he raised his arm up to block my shot, and he barked, “no photos!” To which I replied with all the incredulity of a four-year old, “What?!? I can’t take pictures of Santa?” And he said, ‘no’ and shook his head. And the girls in the front came to see what was up and there I was with my camera just wanting to take a photo of Santa in the mall… and they scowled and Santa scowled and well… it really was rather sad…

So I’ll be finding a nasty lump of coal in my stocking this year.

Sob, sob… oh Santa… how could you???

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23/12/2011 at 11:49 pm

The Lion

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22/12/2011 at 12:57 am

Yangtze traffic

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We’d disembarked our riverboat a few miles down river (think 19th century Mississippi Riverboat). The waters this high up a tributary were far too shallow for anything that size to navigate. And we got into boats just like this, powered by shoulders and sweat and amazingly muscular thighs – that disembarked and pulled us through the bits of the river that were too shallow to navigate by oar.

This was a lovely sight, oddly muted in the way that foreign languages often are when you cannot understand a word – and these remote villagers spoke a dialect only our local guide understood. A truly lovely young woman, she couldn’t refrain from breaking into song and regaled us with several Carpenters melodies, while the villagers bargained, unloaded their goods and the river gurgled and the sun beat down as if it had nothing else to do that day.

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19/12/2011 at 10:53 pm

Good fences

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This image has a couple of inspirations – Happy Daze commented on my post the other day that good fences make good neighbours. Which got me thinking about good fences and good neighbours… I took this photo on a trip to the south Pacific islands late last year – it was taken in Lifou, which is part of the Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia and is owned by France. Though not taken on the same trip, I had a similar sort of reaction as I did to the land divers on Pentecost Island in Vanuatu a couple of years prior – feeling suddenly demoted from traveller/visitor to gawking tourist.

It was a scorching hot day, and there the dancers were, performing under the blinding, blazing sun. Except for a few who were deliberately working the audience, they didn’t make eye contact, didn’t connect with us. The photos were terrible – glare, high contrast, no real depth… Not that the show was unpleasant to watch, it just felt like a performance not connected to anything. After, we went for a wander through the village and surrounds, moving very slowly in the monstrous heat.

We came upon this dancer again, still in costume, animatedly talking on his cellphone. (And why shouldn’t he? I had my cellphone with me…) THAT would have been the photo to take, but it would also have been completely inappropriate, so I refrained.

I hate the phrase ‘developing country’ especially since it is often applied to cultures older than our own. 3rd world is right out. Even more, I hate the idea that any culture would be considered developing as they move away from their traditions to adopting western ways. But… the idea of ‘protecting’ them from outside interference is paternalistic, rather insulting. Seems to me this is a good case for good fences. Hopefully built cooperatively.

Oh, and the other inspiration for this photo came from a blast from the past that zoomed my way this week – from back in the Dorloo days. Her family lived down the road from mine. She also grew up to be a photographer and artist and has taken some wonderful shots of native American dancers. (http://www.thejenniferjeffers.com/powwow-photography.html)

They sparked me to think about my images, which I never did anything with because technically, they were a bit crap… but technique is only part of the story – sometimes a very small part of the story. And I like this photo because it reminds me of this young man, and how he has feet in two worlds…

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18/12/2011 at 12:37 am

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